Class Schedule - Fall 2020

ENGL 103 - Intro to Fiction

An introduction to the study of literature and literary history at the university level. Explores such topics as: the historical role and place of fictional narratives, the idea of genre, relationships between context and meaning in fictional works. Student will develop a critical vocabulary for interpreting and analyzing narrative strategies. Credit is not given for both ENGL 103 and ENGL 109.

ENGL 104 - Introduction to Film

Thoughtful viewing of diverse films (in required weekly screenings), along with ample discussion and critical reading and writing, to gain understanding of cinematic expression and of film's capacity to entertain and to exert artistic and social influence. Same as MACS 104.

ENGL 109 - Intro to Fiction-ACP

Introduction to critical analysis of prose fiction. Explores a wide range of short and long fiction across historical periods; examines narrative strategies such as plot, character, and point of view. Special emphasis placed on good literary critical writing. Course is similar to ENGL 103 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both ENGL 109 and ENGL 103. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

ENGL 115 - Intro to British Literature

Acquaints students with the rich diversity of British prose, poetry, and drama. As a basic introduction to English literature, the course explores a series of literary texts, often thematically related, which appeal to modern readers and at the same time provide interesting insights into the cultural attitudes and values of the periods which produced them.

ENGL 116 - Introduction to American Literature

American literature speaks in distinctive dialects that pre-date the arrival of European explorers in the Renaissance, range across centuries and continents, and intermingle a rich variety of racial, ethnic, and gendered perspectives. Genres examined in this course might include lyric poems, dystopian novels, horror stories, seduction narratives, slave narratives, political speeches, or postmodern plays. Writers studied might include Walt Whitman, Columbus, Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Herman Melville, Edgar Allan Poe, Junot Díaz, Harriet Beecher Stowe, David Foster Wallace, Martin Luther King, and Lin-Manuel Miranda.

ENGL 119 - Literature of Fantasy

Introduction to the rich traditions of fantasy writing in world literature. While the commercial category of fantasy post-Tolkien will often be the focal point, individual instructors may choose to focus on alternate definitions of the genre: literatures of the fantastic, the uncanny, and the weird; fantasy before the Enlightenment and the advent of realism; fantasy for young adult or child readers; and so on. Same as CWL 119.

ENGL 120 - Science Fiction

Introduction to the study of science fiction, the genre that has both contributed to scientific knowledge and attempted to make sense of the changes that have taken place in the world since the Enlightenment, the onset of industrialization, and the acceleration of technology. Texts are taken from a variety of literary and pop culture sources: pulps and magazines, novels and films, comics and TV shows.

ENGL 121 - Introduction to Comics

Introduction to graphic narratives---comic books, comic strips, graphic novels, manga, webcomics, and so on---from a diverse panoply of cultural, formal, and historical traditions.

ENGL 122 - Swords, Sorcery & Sex: The Middle Ages in Popular Culture

Explores the use of medievalism in contemporary popular culture. Instructors may draw from film, television, music, fiction, graphic novels, gaming, and other sources, and they approach the material from a variety of cultural, historical, and aesthetic traditions. The goal of the course will be to understand how the medieval periods of world cultures have been reinvented in modern times, and how modernity has been constructed in relation and in opposition to the medieval imaginary. Same as MDVL 122.

ENGL 199 - Undergraduate Open Seminar

Topics course that varies each semester and by section. The topics offered each semester will be listed in the Class Schedule. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

ENGL 200 - Introduction to the Study of Literature and Culture

Introduction to the study of literature in the twenty-first century. This course will expand your sense of what literature is and where it happens, including discussion of old and new literary forms (from novels, poems, and plays to comic books, video games, and films). Along the way, students will explore some of the literary and cultural opportunities (such as author readings, scholarly talks, and performances) available to them on a large public university campus, with two goals in mind: to develop your critical interpretive skills and to acquaint you with the discipline of literary studies as it is being practiced all around us today, both inside and outside the conventional classroom.

ENGL 202 - Medieval Literature and Culture

Introduction to the diverse literatures and cultures of the global Middle Ages (Approx. 500-1500 CE). Students will read works by medieval authors in Modern English translation, with particular attention to placing works in their historical and material contexts. Same as CWL 253 and MDVL 201. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 206 - Enlightenment Literature and Culture

Study in Anglophone and global texts from the period 1600 to 1800, with attention to cultural and historical contexts. Same as CWL 257. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 208 - Victorian Literature and Culture

While Queen Victoria was on the throne (1837-1901), Britain became a world power, but often looked backwards to the lovely worlds of the past. Many of the era’s great literary works reflect this tension between realism and romance: between the realism of being a poor governess and the romance of finding true love in Jane Eyre; the tragedy of losing your best friend and the hope of emotional survival in In Memoriam; the practical work of building a useful device and the fantasy of visiting the dystopian future in The Time Machine. Literature studied in this class will include poetry, prose, drama, and fiction, possibly including works by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Seacole, Thomas Carlyle, Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, William Morris, Oscar Wilde, H.G. Wells, Olive Schreiner, or George Bernard Shaw. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 209 - Early British Literature and Culture

This course surveys more than a thousand years of British literature from the early Middle Ages through the Renaissance and well into the eighteenth century. But what does "British literature" really mean, especially in the context of an island archipelago populated by multiple nations (England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) and repeatedly subjected to foreign rule (either by violent invasion or dynastic succession)? The range of texts we thus characterize as "early British literature" is staggering, and part of our goal in this course will simply be to appreciate the sheer volume and breadth of written work created in Britain and Ireland between the sixth and eighteenth centuries. We will do this through a necessarily selective sampling of historical periods, languages, and genres. Our authors will range from the famous (e.g., Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton) to the lesser-known (e.g., Marie de France, Lady Mary Wroth, and Eliza Haywood) to the unknown (e.g., the anonymous Beowulf-poet). Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement and ENGL 200.

ENGL 213 - Modernist Literature and Culture

Study of literature, philosophy, visual and performing arts, social criticism, and popular sciences of the Anglo-American Modern period (1880-1920), with attention to broad cultural issues. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 218 - Introduction to Shakespeare

Representative readings of Shakespeare's drama and poetry in the context of his age, with emphasis on major plays; selections vary from section to section. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 219 - Literature and Medicine

Introduction to the interchange between the medical and literary imaginations – how diseases, bodies, and minds get written about and represented culturally. The premise of the course is that ideas and experiences concerning our health are always mediated through the literature we read, the films we watch, and the stories we tell our doctors and that they tell us. Our focus will be on how literature and film have played and continue to play a crucial role in understanding health on local, national, and global scales.

ENGL 222 - Jewish American and US Minority Literatures in Dialogue

Same as CWL 209 and JS 209. See JS 209.

ENGL 225 - Intro to Latina/o Literature

Same as LLS 242 and SPAN 242. See LLS 242.

ENGL 245 - The Short Story

Historical and critical study of the short story (American and European) from the early nineteenth century to the present. Same as CWL 267. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 250 - Nineteenth-Century American Fiction

Nineteenth-century fiction gave us some of the most iconic images in American culture--the scarlet letter, the white whale--and some of the most captivating works about American life and society. This course will explore how fictional texts articulated the problems of nineteenth-century democracy, including the crises over slavery leading to the Civil War, and the rise of large-scale capitalism and urban modernity later in the century. We will look at such literary movements as sentimentalism, sensationalism, realism, and naturalism, among others. Writers studied might include Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Mark Twain, Pauline Hopkins, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, and many others. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 253 - Topics in Literature and New Media

Introduction to the role technological invention has played in history of print media and how literary aesthetics are changing with the advent of new media, such as software, video games, and graphic novels. We will consider material formats, genres, and modes of production along with the cultural, political, and societal implications of different forms and formats. May be repeated in separate terms up to 6 hours.

ENGL 255 - Early American Literature and Culture

This large-scale survey course offers students background in a wide range of genres, authors, and texts, focusing on "early American literature," which ranges from pre-Columbian indigenous narratives to nineteenth century novels, poems, and plays. The material studied ranges across multiple centuries and continents, and includes a wide variety of racial, ethnic, and gendered perspectives. Writers may include Christopher Columbus, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, William Apess, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement and ENGL 200.

ENGL 259 - Early African American Literature and Culture

An introduction to the study of early African American literary and cultural production, ranging from the earliest writings by African descended people in British North America in the eighteenth century to the end of World War I. At each turn, we will situate texts in their cultural and historical contexts, attending not only to the specificity of a particular text's moment, but also to the forces of contingency and tradition at play in the construction of literary, cultural, and political communities. Throughout our discussions we will think about both the "African-ness" and "American-ness" of African American literature as collective and imaginative processes. Early African Americans wrote for a variety of reasons—philosophical, political, pleasurable, instrumental—and protesting slavery and racism was just one (albeit an important one) among many of those reasons. We will read letters, poems, sermons, songs, constitutions and bylaws for religious and civic organizations, stories, and texts that defy easy categorization. Writers may include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Maria Stewart, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances E.W. Harper, William Wells Brown, W.E.B. Du Bois, Pauline Hopkins, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Alice Dunbar Nelson, and Ida B. Wells. Same as AFRO 259 and CWL 259. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 260 - Modern African American Literature and Culture

Historical and critical study of African American literature in its social and cultural context between 1915 and 1980. Same as AFRO 260 and CWL 260. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 265 - Intro to American Indian Lit

Same as AIS 265. See AIS 265.

ENGL 266 - Grimm's Fairy Tales in Context

Same as CWL 254 and GER 251. See GER 251.

ENGL 270 - American Film Genres

Introduction to the study of the dominant genres or types U.S. cinema. Examines the elements that constitute genres (such as visual and narrative patterns), the formation and reshaping of genres by filmmakers and the entertainment industry, the social and cultural factors that influence the genre cycles and subgenres, and the landmark works of each genre. The course treats several genres in historical perspective or focus on a single genre. May be repeated in separate terms up to 6 hours if topics vary.

ENGL 273 - American Cinema, 1950-2000

Explores key issues in America cinema during the second half of the twentieth century, connecting central problems of film studies (e.g., authorship, genre, narratology, style, gender analysis, and the spectacle of violence) to moments of major transition in the American film industry (e.g., the Red Scare and the end of the Production Code in the 1950s; the emergence of the New Hollywood and the breakdown of the studio system in the 1960s; and the rise of the mega-blockbuster in the 1970s). Same as MACS 273. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 281 - Women in the Literary Imagination

Study of the way writers of all genders have portrayed women's images, social roles, and psychologies in British, American, or Anglophone literatures. Same as GWS 281. May be repeated in separate semesters to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary; with permission from English advising office. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 285 - Postcolonial Literature in English

Examination of selected postcolonial literature, theory, and film as texts that "write back" to dominant European representations of power, identity, gender and the Other. Postcolonial writers, critics and filmmakers studied may include Franz Fanon, Edward Said, Aime Cesaire, Ousmane Sembene, Chinua Achebe, Michelle Cliff, Mahesweta Devi, Buchi Emecheta, Derek Walcott and Marlene Nourbese-Philip. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 290 - Individual Study

Study of selected topics. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 301 - Introduction to Critical Theory

Introduction to the critical frameworks and methods that have had the greatest impact on the field of literary studies. Students will read, discuss, and write about numerous theoretical approaches, including (but not limited to) critical race studies, ecocriticism, feminism, Marxism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, and structuralism. No previous background with theory is required. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement; one year of college literature or consent of instructor. For majors only.

ENGL 311 - History of the English Language

Language variation and change from the earliest forms of English to the present day, with emphasis on the rise of Standard English and the social, geographic, and cultural aspects of linguistic change in English. Credit is not given for both ENGL 310 and ENGL 311.

ENGL 322 - Dostoevsky

Same as CWL 324 and RUSS 322. See RUSS 322.

ENGL 330 - Slavery and Identity

Explores slavery in the Americas through its representation in literature over time. Using a variety of disciplinary approaches, we will look at the enslaved, the enslavers, and the middle merchants who facilitated the slave trade, and will examine the experience of slavery and the economic, political, religious, and scientific justifications used to maintain it. We will also examine the African cultural traditions from which the slaves emerged and the aspects of it that lent to creation of the new U.S. culture.

ENGL 350 - Writing about Literature, Text, and Culture

Writing-intensive, variable-topic course designed to improve English majors' ability to produce clear, well-organized, analytically sound and persuasively argued essays relevant to English studies. Introduces students to research techniques through the examination of critical texts appropriate to the course topic. Credit is not given for ENGL 300 and ENGL 350. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement; one year of college literature or consent of instructor. For majors only.

ENGL 359 - Lit Responses to the Holocaust

Same as CWL 320, JS 320, REL 320, and YDSH 320. See YDSH 320.

ENGL 360 - Environmental Writing

Same as ESE 360. See ESE 360.

ENGL 373 - Special Topics in Film Studies

Extended investigation of major subjects and issues in cinema and other media; topics vary and typically include studies of author/directors, genres, historical movements, critical approaches, and themes. Same as MACS 373. May be repeated with permission of English advising office to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary. Prerequisite: One college-level course in film studies or literature.

ENGL 380 - Topics in Writing Studies

Advanced-level work in the field of Writing Studies. Building upon a traditional disciplinary understanding of writing as rhetoric, this course invites students to call upon sociological, anthropological, and/or ideological approaches to the study of writing in order to understand the myriad ways that writing makes meaning(s). See Class Schedule for topics. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of the Composition I requirement.

ENGL 390 - Advanced Individual Study

Advanced study of selected topics. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 391 - Honors Individual Study

Study of selected topics. Restricted to English and English education majors with a 3.33 average who are working towards the degree with distinction in English or in English education. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Enroll in undergraduate advising office.

ENGL 396 - English Honors Seminar

An open-topic, discussion-oriented seminar aimed at majors who have shown high skill and intensive interest in the area of English studies. May be repeated up to 6 hours in the same term to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: A 3.33 grade point average or consent of the English Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies. Restricted to English majors.

ENGL 402 - Descriptive English Grammar

An introduction to English linguistics with emphasis on the phonetic, syntactic, and semantic structures of English; language variation, standardization, and change; language legislation and linguistic rights; English as a world language; and the study of language in American schools. Same as BTW 402. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ENGL 404 - Engl Grammar for ESL Teachers

Same as EIL 422. See EIL 422.

ENGL 411 - Chaucer

A selection of Chaucer's major works read in Middle English. Instructors will usually emphasize either the Canterbury Tales or Troilus and Criseyde and the dream visions, but alternate combinations of texts are possible. Students will also be introduced to Chaucer's fourteenth-century context. Same as MDVL 411. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 418 - Shakespeare

Survey of the plays and poems of William Shakespeare. Reading assignments will reflect the generic diversity and historical breadth of Shakespeare's work. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 435 - Nineteenth-Century British Fiction

From Jane Austen's witty couples to Charles Dickens's haunted reformers and Bram Stoker's aristocratic vampires, the characters, stories, and novels created by British writers in the nineteenth century still fascinate us today. This research class gives students a chance to read deeply in the prose fiction of this period; texts may include William Thackeray's Vanity Fair, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone, and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated with permission of English advising office to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours if topics vary; Graduate students may repeat if topics vary. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 455 - Major Authors

Intensive study of the work of one or two major authors. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated with permission of English advising office to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours if topics vary. May be repeated for graduate credit if topics vary. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 477 - Advanced Environmental Writing

Introduces students to the challenges of "turning data into narrative." With a focus on students' professional development as writers, this course emphasizes the research and rhetorical skills required to communicate current scientific research in earth and environmental science through non-fiction narrative forms--the investigative essay, long-form journalism, personal memoir, and op-ed--aimed at a general audience. Same as ESE 477. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.

ENGL 481 - Composition Theory and Practice

Study of the history and theory of written composition. This course explores basic rhetorical principles, various theoretical perspectives in the field of composition/rhetoric, and helps students form practical approaches to the guidance of, response to, and structuring of student writing. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One year of college literature or consent of instructor.